Is there an end to Apple’s growth?

March 20, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Business, Finances, Technology 

apple-logo1What do you do if you are the richest company in the world?  What next steps should you take?  Is there really an end to your reign?  What are you paranoid about?

Look at Apple’s last quarter:  $75.5B in revenue with a mind boggling operating income of  $25.2B.  That is 33.3%;  a third of every dollar Apple sells goes to the bottom line (pre-taxes).  Another way to look at these numbers is (are you ready?) $838M in revenue profiting $280M per day.  Or $35M of revenue with profits of $11.6M per hour.  $3,236.50 of profit per second.  But wait, there’s more!  After a super aggressive dividend and stock buyback program, Apple carries $32B in cash, and $145B in long term investments.

If there was ever a money printing machine, that would be Steve Jobs’ legacy.

Wall Street values Apple at close to $750B in market cap.  Just to put this in perspective, Saudi Arabia’s GDP is close to $750B and it is the 19th economy in the world. And it is not an expensive stock in Wall Street’s terms.

The question is, where is this going?

It is evident that last quarter, closing on Dec 31st, 2014 was hugely benefited by the iPhone 6, a long overdue overhaul of Apple’s flagship product so it can get close to the spec of Samsung’s money losing, much better (spec-wise) Galaxy S5 and Note 4.  The thing is, as impressive as it sounds, Apple sold 75M iPhones in the last quarter of 2014.  This represents close to 70% of their revenue, which makes them very, very vulnerable to disruption. Remember Blackberry or the Motorola Razr?  Yeah, I didn’t think you would.  My apologies to all Apple fans for comparing.  I know it will take a lot more than a better device to disrupt the iPhone hegemony, but you can see how history can repeat itself.  It took less than 2 years for the indisputable market leaders to fall like a rock. Innovation came and went.

Now, I’m not saying that Apple has stopped innovating, but it is so dependent on a single product that, as an investor, I would be concerned.  The watch, as interesting as it sounds, cannot cover for what iPhone has done for the company, and perhaps never will.  iPod started a trend, iPhone disrupted and improved on it, iPad was supposed to do that, but it didn’t.  It just helped sell more iPhones, not a bad thing, but is is sustainable?  What is the next iPhone?  Nobody knows.

Analysts and pundits claim that the next step is for Apple to reach $1T in market cap.  If the P/E multiple says constant they would need to make more profit or $33.5.  At constant margins it will mean $100B in revenue in a quarter, or around what Walmart’s revenue was in 2010.  It seems far fetched, don’t you think?  But then again, $75B in revenue in a quarter and $750B in market cap seemed unfathomable just a few years ago.  It is a fact that AAPL has broken all common sense with a focus on 1 simple thing:  delight customers with a great product.

So, my loyal reader (singular) go buy an iPhone, it will cost you about the same as 5 shares of AAPL if you buy it un-subsidized but it will not make you money as the shares would.  Have you bought 5 shares of AAPL at the launch of the first iPhone, it would have set you back a little under $82.  They will be worth today a little under $640. Or you could have bought back then 39 shares of APPL for the cost of the iPhone that would be worth today close to $5000. So you’d have made almost 30% annually over the past 8 years.  Impressive?  For sure!  Sustainable, I think not.

Enjoy!

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