Palm got a hand

April 28, 2010 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Business, Technology 

Well apparently there is some hope for the nearly dead.   One more time I’m wrong and someone did find enough value for Palm, unlike I had predicted before.   Although in this blogger’s humble opinion $1.2B seems a little excessive.  Sure, HPQ has the cash to spare, but a Webkit browser on top of Linux does not take that much money.  Granted Palm has a good device or two, but in this environment it takes more than a good device to unseat the emperor.  I guess they’d figure they’d offer a sign-on bonus to Palm employees ($5.70 / share is a bit too distant to the $17+ back in October 2009) since they would really struggle to assemble a team like that on their own.

Sure there’s some intellectual property and some innovation left in the inventor of the category.  And it is the fastest growing and one of the most profitable markets in the industry but the world does not need that many mobile Operating Systems (OS) to choose from.  I’m sorry.  As I’ve pointed out before, to unseat the iPhone it will take more, a lot more than multitasking, a cool form factor, and a clever UI.  I’m sure HP will make products people want to buy, but the question in my mind is will HP be able to create the ecosystem that will finally challenge Apple?  I quite frankly doubt it.  Not because it is impossible, or because HP doesn’t have the skills, it is because it is not in their DNA and Palm does not bring that to the table.

Other bloggers (the real ones) are talking about tablets and netbooks using WebOS.  Now that is even crazier.  If a stretched out iPhone makes little sense, a bloated Pre (will they call it HP-Pro or the Maxi?) doesn’t make much sense either.  A clever-phone OS will make a tablet look like a dumb keyboardless PC (no offense Steve).  Besides, with no app store, no cult to follow you, no content delivery, no store chain, no Steve (sorry Mark) things don’t look too promising.  Besides, HP is a much more powerful brand than Palm, so it’s not that they’re bringing that to the table.

So, my dear follower (singular).  Let’s just regret having covered our short a day too late and wait for their next move.  An app delivery company? video distribution? or perhaps music delivery?  We’ll see.  But one thing is certain: there will be more of these moves (some may be really big).   Microsoft, Dell, HTC, RIM, and others will be on the M&A news soon.

Enjoy.

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Ma Bell teaches us a lesson

April 21, 2010 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Business, Finances, Technology 

In the shadow of Apple’s kick-butt quarter, AT&T reported results that made the market yawn.  “Yeah, yeah, you sold 2.7 million new iPhones in the quarter, added 1.9 million subscribers for a total of 87 million (1 in every 3.5 US residents uses AT&T), reduced churn, and increased ARPU (average revenue per unit) 3.9%,  and a 30% increase in data revenue; so what?” is essentially what Wall Street said.  I don’t know about you, but a company that still manages these numbers in a market that is essentially 100% penetrated is impressive – sure, a 6%+ dividend helps .  But the really impressive, albeit insignificant number to this humble blogger is the “connected devices” increase of 1.1 million to a total of 5.8 million.

AT&T has close to 6 million non-phone devices on the network.  Now why is that even relevant, my fellow reader (singular)?  Simply because there are a lot more non-phone devices and a lot more things out there that need to be connected than there are phones or people.  Yes, they may not be sexy, play music, browse the web, or even wash your car, but they essentially do everything else.  Beyond the obvious (Kindles, iPads, etc.) these things are everywhere and in desperate need to be connected.

Take your car, for example.  If you have Onstar it’s already connected (not with AT&T) so you know some possible apps.  But imagine a world in which you go to Google Maps, plan a route and squirt it into your car’s GPS!  Or simply download the movie you want your kids to watch from your home DVR.  Your electric meter one day will be connected to so you can monitor your consumption real time (Ok, Ok, i don’t know why would I want to do that either, but you can).  Every thing out there can be connected and can benefit from the internet.  But where things really start changing is with Enterprise Applications.

Next time you receive a FedEx or UPS package go to the web  immediately after you sign for it and voila it says received, in real time because the device where you signed is connected.  The copier service personnel can consult schematics and order parts in real time when his/her machines are connected. Or the copier can ping someone when it’s running out of toner; the end of the  empty copiers or useless service visits.  Making every device a smart device has endless  applications that are starting to look affordable.  Ma Bell’s humble cellular non-phone numbers are starting to show growth.  The ubiquitously  connected world is getting started.  Make sure you are ready for it.

Enjoy.

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Palm Looks for a Helping Hand

April 13, 2010 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Business, Technology 

In the past couple of days Palm’s stock (NASDAQ: PALM) has soared from around $3.5 to above $6 (from a 52 week high of $18 by the way) amidst rumors of an imminent buyout.  The question in my mind is who wants to pay close to a billion dollars for a company that looses $100M a quarter, has no cash, and it is debt ridden?  A fraction of that money will get any company in the smartphone game.  Most are already there, arguably with a little excess as I pointed out here.

Granted, their products are good, WebOS is a neat idea, but they have lost the clout they once had.  It is sad to see a Palm, in a way the inventor of the category suffer this fate.  But hey, in this industry you have to listen to Bob Dylan: “You’d better start swimming or you’ll sink like a stone, ’cause the times they are a-changing.”

So what happened to Palm?  Execution and focus, lack of them, that is.  Back in the late 90’s with an explosive IPO after a spin-off of US Robotics everything looked rosy.  But they got greedy instead of focused.  But as Michael Douglas said in Wall Street: “Greed is good”.  No question but greed has to have a source.  And my fellow reader (singular) that has to be your products, not Wall Street itself!  It is my theory that Palm, as many other great corporations get too caught up in Wall Street’s metrics, quarters, and their leaders making money off of money alone, that they loose focus on the main thing:  Their products.  Countless corporations (Google, Apple, Toyota, Ford, etc.) are the opposite: they have focused on creating the best products or services, and Wall Street follows.

Greed is indeed good, but with a focused source.

Enjoy.

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